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August 25, 2013

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Wedding Tipping Guidelines from Phoenix Wedding PlannerKim Horn, MBC

Wedding Tipping Guidelines from Phoenix Wedding Planner Kim Horn, MBC

Your RSVPs are in (finally), and you’re three weeks from your wedding day!  As your wedding planner, this is the time to have all your details wrapped up.  Relax and enjoy quality time with your family and friends prior to your wedding day!

One of the questions I get asked as things wind down is, “Who and how much should I tip?”  With all the details, many seem to overlook the important task (and etiquette) of tipping.

Below is my go-to guide on tipping, so you show your wedding vendors, who put your wedding together, your appreciation for making your wedding day amazing.  Tipping isn’t required, unless a service charge is spelled out in your contract.  Tipping is a voluntary and customary expression of appreciation for exceptional service.

The golden rule is to check your vendor list to make sure you don’t forget someone.

Tipping Guidelines

1). Use the guidelines below, and write a check or place cash into an envelope with their name on the outside of the envelope.  Always carry additional cash and bring your check book for possibility of overtime charges or other incidentals.

2). Personalize a thank-you note to the vendors with a few details on how they helped you throughout the planning process.

3). Give your wedding planner all the envelopes at your wedding rehearsal.  The wedding planner will discreetly pass out your envelopes to your vendors.

VENDOR SUGGESTED TIP PROTOCOL HELPFUL HINT
BAND/DJ Musicians $20-$50 each; Band leader $100-$250; DJ $50 – $200 Optional, yet majority do tip. Need # of Band Members
BARTENDER $20-$25 per bartender Expected, check contract. Need # of Bartenders and if they are assigned exclusive to your wedding.
BELLMAN $10 – $20 each Expected, check contract. Moving your gifts.
CATERING MANAGER $200 – $500 Optional, yet majority do tip.
CHEF $150 – $200 Optional, yet majority do tip, especially if designed a special menu for you.
FLORISTS Depends on contract. Optional, depends on if they already charge you for delivery, setup, strike, and moving sets.
GIFT BAG DELIVERY Avg. of $2 – $3 per bag for bellman to deliver to room. Expected, check contract. Names on bags help bellman identify bag(s) per room or guest.
HAIRSTYLIST/MAKEUP ARTIST/NAIL TECH 15%-20% of total bill Expected Let your wedding party know you are handling the tip so they aren’t tipped twice.
HEAD CAPTAIN or BANQUET CAPTAIN $1 – $5 per guest Expected, check your contract to see service charge fee, then find out how much of service charge goes to staff vs. catering company or resort vs. staff. Try to get multiple events with the same captain.
OFFICIANT If member of church, donate $500+ to church,; Non-denominational $50-$100 depending on fee they charge. Expected
PHOTOGRAPHER $50-$200 each Optional
SERVING STAFF 15%-25% (Normally in Contract, yet Servers don’t receive all of this) Optional, based on contract. Need # of servers, and see if Head Capt. Could dispurse.
TRANSPORTATION 15% – 20% (Normally % is stated in contract) Expected, yet check contract to make sure it isn’t already included in fee. Find out qty.  and names of drivers.
VALET $1-$2 per car Expected, yet check contract. Let your guests know if you are tipping so they aren’t tipped twice.
VIDEOGRAPHER $50-$200 each Optional Need # of manned cameras.
WEDDING PLANNER $200 – $500, depends on how much $, time, and stress they saved you Optional, yet majority do tip. Will your lead wedding planner be at your wedding or an assistant?

 

Copyright 2013, Kim Horn, MBC™

Hire Kim as your wedding planner, call 480.921.7891 or text your name, wedding date, and wedding planner request to 602.418.9089.

Kim M. Horn, MBC™

Master Bridal Consultant | 1 of 61 in the World

Scottsdale Wedding Planner | Paradise Valley Wedding Planner | Chandler Wedding Planner | Phoenix Wedding Planner | Destination Weddings

Publisher | Pres. | ArizonaBridalSource.com

AZ State Coordinator Assoc. of Bridal Consultants May 2003 – May 2012

2010 Annual Conference Chair (worked with David Tutera) – Assoc. of Bridal Consultants

O 480.921.7891

M 602.418.9089

F 480.829.6292

E info@ArizonaBridalSource.com

ArizonaBridalSource.com

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August 1, 2013

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http://TheWrightHouse.com

http://TheWrightHouse.com

Plan ahead, and consider the logistics of your get ready location.  Plan ahead for your get ready room and get ready photography.  You may want to get ready at your parents’ home, a hotel room, or a wedding venue’s bridal suite.  The Wright House (photo to the left) has a gorgeous get ready room fully equipped with natural lighting, space, seating, and an adjoining bathroom.  Weigh the pros and cons of each location.  You will need to factor in time for transportation to get everyone to your ceremony site (unless it is at the same property).   If you are having your ceremony and reception at a hotel, most hotels will provide a get ready room in your agreement, yet may not be able to get you an early check-in (depending on occupancy levels).  You will be less stressed if you pay extra to check into your room the night before your wedding, so everything is easier for your wedding day.

Lighting, timing, space, and minimal clutter is important.  Your “get ready” photos will be taken in your get ready room.  Discuss with your photographer natural lighting and start times so you know to be ready to start photos.  Work with your photographer on lighting since they will LOVE lots of natural lighting with large windows vs. being in a dim light room with no or minimal windows, or florescent lighting.  If you are getting ready in a hotel room, ask your hotel representative if there is an upgrade price (less the room you get included in your plan) so you may pay for a more picturesque room for get ready photos with large windows.  Think about the number of people you will be having in your room too.  Space is important, and think about how many you don’t want clutter of everyone’s bags in the photos.

Focus on a realistic plans for photography, hair and makeup schedules.  Your wedding planner will need to back out additional time for hair and makeup schedules.  Most people will need to be finished with hair and makeup when the photographer starts with the bride getting into her gown.  Most will not want to have photos without their hair done, or without their makeup finished.  Depending on how many faces you have for makeup (average 45 min. per face, and 1 hr. for the bride) and how many heads you have for your hairstylists (average 45 min. – 1 hr. per head, then 1 -1.5 hours for bride), plan on starting early and having touch-ups as needed.

Here are items to consider for your get ready room:

–         Breakfast ordered (dietary restrictions), and scheduled to be delivered to your room for you, your wedding party, MOB (mother of the bride), and MOG (mother of the groom).

–         Lunch ordered (dietary restrictions), and scheduled to be delivered to your room for you, your wedding party, MOB, and MOG.

–         Straws for drinking to not mess up make-up

–         Adequate bathrooms for everyone to shower and go to the restroom too

–         Mirrors (so not everyone crowds the bathroom)

–         Music downloaded on your iPod to play your favorites

–         Fans to circulate air

–         Steamer for wrinkle free dresses

–         Hanger for your dress which is photo worthy for your “gown photo on a hanger”

–         Bar stools for makeup artist (unless they bring their own)

–         Lighting for makeup

–         Power strips for hair dryers, flat irons, curling irons, rollers, etc.

–         Charger for your phone

–         Signs for fun wedding party photos “Just wait until you see her!”

–         If you are at a hotel, find out how many other weddings and/or brides will be on site at the same time.  Find out what locations are the hotels favorite photography locations, when they will be in shade, and when they will be available for photography for you.

–         Chairs and props to help with group photos

–         Wedding party gifts wrapped and packed for opening for great photos

–         (If at a hotel) Bell man scheduled to pickup the bridesmaids bags so housekeeping may clean room

–         Housekeeping requested to clean the room after you leave for your ceremony

–         Arrange for amenities for late night after your wedding – drinks, munchies, turn down of your bed.

–         Arrange for breakfast in bed for the day after your wedding with you and your fiance’s favorites!

 

Copyright 2013, Kim Horn, MBC™

Hire Kim as your wedding planner, call 480.921.7891 or text your name, wedding date, and wedding planner request to 602.418.9089.

 

Kim M. Horn, MBC™

Master Bridal Consultant | 1 of 61 in the World

Scottsdale Wedding Planner | Paradise Valley Wedding Planner | Chandler Wedding Planner | Phoenix Wedding Planner | Destination Weddings

Publisher | Pres. | ArizonaBridalSource.com

AZ State Coordinator Assoc. of Bridal Consultants May 2003 – May 2012

2010 Annual Conference Chair (worked with David Tutera) – Assoc. of Bridal Consultants

 

O 480.921.7891

M 602.418.9089

F 480.829.6292

E info@ArizonaBridalSource.com

ArizonaBridalSource.com

 

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September 2, 2012

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DulceCreative.com - Jamie Denke Portfolio

DulceCreative.com - Jamie Denke Portfolio

As a bride or groom, your Wedding Guest List may be easy to compile, or may be your worst nightmare.  This is the first time you will be combining both of your families for multiple events, and everyone has their own opinion on what is appropriate or inappropriate.  Trimming the guest list may turn into a heated debate, yet this blog (since you cannot be with me 24/7) will fast track you to realistic solutions which work best for you!  Your guest list WILL dictate how much you spend and your ceremony and reception location.  If you invite 150 couples, this may easily translate into 300 guests.

The Ultimate Guest List.  A magical number of family and friends which fits the size and style of your ceremony and reception sites, while staying within your wedding budget.

Invite Your Inner Circle of Family and Friends to Reduce Expenses.  Your wedding guest list should be your closest, most intimate friends and family members.   Focus on people who matter to you most.  Who was your priority to announce personally you just got engaged?  Although you may have an enormous family and circle of friends, it is important to trim the size of your wedding guest list to reduce expenses.  Trimming your wedding guest list is the number one way to save money!  If you haven’t seen or talked to them in a few years, they may be the easiest to cut first.

Make an Extensive List.  Ask your parents, your fiancé, and his parents to compile a wedding guest list including everyone they would imagine inviting.  Have them include and list their people in categories so it is easier when you are making table arrangements (i.e., wedding party, siblings, grandparents, aunts, uncles, family, friends, neighbors, bosses, co-workers, business acquaintances, college friends, high school friends, and distant relatives).  Make sure everyone knows this is the “Fantasy Wish List”, and cuts will need to be made to stay within your budget.

Be Respectful.  Count on one thing when deciding on your wedding guest list, disagreement.  Everyone will have an opinion about your wedding, and especially about who should be invited.  When you get your red pen to trim your list, make sure you are respectful to your fiancé, your parents, and his parents.

Who is Paying, Divide Equally, and Apply Rules Fairly.  If you are running into conflicts when trimming your list, consider who will be paying the bill.  Budgeting for the wedding is something you must discuss at the beginning of your wedding planning.  If your parents are paying for most of the wedding, they will obviously have more control of your guest list.  Try to divide the guest list evenly.  Make across-the-board, and clear-cut decisions on who to cut, (i.e., invite all aunts and uncles, yet eliminate third generation cousins).

Make Your MUST Have  List.  This is your “A List” of who you MUST have at your wedding.  This may be your parents, siblings, grandparents, and wedding party.  The ones left on your list which did not make it to your “A List”, will be your “B List”.

Who Should be Easier to Cut?  When you start making cuts, your colleagues, out-of-touch friends, and distant relatives you haven’t seen or talked to in over one year should understand if you want to keep your wedding guest list to your closest family and friends.  Don’t feel obligated to invite neighbors or other brides which have recently invited you to their wedding.

Limit Your Plus Ones.  It is up to you if you will allow a friend to bring a date.  Common courtesy dictates if your friend lives with, or is in a serious relationship with someone, this “plus one” should be invited to the wedding.  If your friend has a different person each month, this doesn’t mean they should be invited.  Talk with your friend first before assuming, and this is an easy way to get the name of their guest.  If they can’t give you a name, probably a good candidate for “no plus one”!

Realistic Guest Counts, Holidays, and Special Events.  On an average, 15% to 20% of your invited guests will not be able to attend.  They may have prior commitments, may not be able to take time off from work, or have other obstacles.  Your wedding date selection is important.  Holiday weekends are when airlines are extremely busy, and airfares will be more expensive.  If you plan your wedding during a major sporting event like Super Bowl weekend, your guests may have a difficult time finding hotel rooms, especially if the Super Bowl is in the same city as your wedding.

Master Guest List.  Combine your personal guest list, your parents’ list, your fiance’s list, and your fiance’s parents’ list into one alphabetical master list.  Check out this free template google docs – Wedding Guest List Template.  Enter your data or download from your computer in a format which is easily sorted in a multitude of ways.  You will refer to this list repetitively to address invitations, check off RSVPs, keep track of RSVPs NOT received, for accurate guest counts, record gifts, mail thank-you notes, and much more.  Here are some categories to include when making your Master Guest List:

a).  Contact information.  Include each guest’s full name, address, city, state, zip, phone, and e-mail address.

b).  Communication Tracker.  Keep track of who you have sent the save-the-date, invitation, and thank-you cards to.

c).  RSVPs.  Use a check mark or a “X” when the guest has RSVPed, with how many family members will be attending.

d).  Record Gifts.  Write down gifts received.

e).  Out-of-Town Guests.  These guests will need information on guest rooms, and you may want to arrange for transportation to pick them from the airport, take them to the ceremony, and return them to their hotel at the conclusion of the reception.

f).  Multiple Events.  If they are invited to one event, by etiquette they must be invited to the wedding.  You may want to have various spreadsheets for multiple events such as your Engagement Party, Bridal Shower, Bachelor Party, Bachelorette Party, Rehearsal Dinner, Golf Outing, Spa Day, Ceremony /Reception, and Brunch the Day After.

g).  Dietary Restrictions.  Indicate if they are a vegetarian, gluten free, diabetic, and list dietary restrictions to share with your caterer.

h).  Children vs. Adult Count vs. Vendor Food Count.  Note the age range of children so when you give the final guest count to your caterer you know numbers for adults, children, and vendor meals.

i).  Guest Code by Relationship.   Make a code for each guest so you know who is issuing the invitation, is it the Bride (B), Parents of the Bride (POB), Groom (G), Parents of the Groom (POG), Sibling (SOB – sister of bride), Wedding Party (WP), Aunt (A), Uncle (U), etc.  This will help you with seating arrangements, and if RSVPs are missing, it will be easier at selecting who would be best to delegate to confirm their RSVP status.

j).  Table Numbers.  If you are having reserved seating to a table, it will be easier to group your guests before you alphabetize your list.

k).  Handicap Guests.  If you have anyone in a wheelchair, you may want to seat them closest to the exit door so they have easy entrance and exit options.

Copyright 2012, Kim Horn, MBC™

To hire Kim as your wedding planner, call 480.921.7891 or text your name, wedding date, and wedding planner request to 602.418.9089.

Kim M. Horn, MBC™

Master Bridal Consultant | 1 of 61 in the World

Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, Chandler, Phoenix and Destination Weddings

Publisher | Pres. | ArizonaBridalSource.com

AZ State Coordinator | Assoc. of Bridal Consultants May 2003 – May 2012

ABC 2010 Conference Chair worked with David Tutera

O 480.921.7891

M 602.418.9089

F 480.829.6292

E info@ArizonaBridalSource.com

ArizonaBridalSource.com

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June 19, 2012

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Create Your Wedding WebsiteMake it easy for your tech savvy guests to keep updated on details of your wedding, create a wedding website!  Don’t stress thinking you have to be a website designer, there are a multitude of free website design templates available at TheKnot.com and WeddingWire.com.

Make the fonts, colors, and style of your site match your wedding.  Try to keep your site to the point, clutter free, and easy to navigate!

Print your Wedding Website Link on your Save-The-Date cards.

Important things to include for Your Wedding Website:

  • Check out secure sites so you don’t have wedding crashers show up at your wedding.  The last thing you need or want is an ex-girlfriend or ex-boyfriend showing up as an uninvited guest at your wedding.
  • When, where, and how you both met
  • When, where, and how he proposed
  • Photos of you, and your fiancé
  • Wedding Party Photos – briefly describing relationships of your BFFs
  • Itinerary for the Weekend – when, where, what time to be there, and what to wear for your ceremony rehearsal, rehearsal dinner, ceremony, reception, and brunch.
  • Map of Events – detailed with directions and parking
  • Travel Information
  • Airport and Flight Information
  • Links to Hotels (with your room block discounted rates, and cut off dates)
  • Area Attractions & Things to Do While in Arizona (Grand Canyon, Sedona, Tucson, Desert Botanical Garden, MIM, Arizona Science Center, list sporting events in town during your wedding week Arizona Cardinals, Arizona Diamondbacks, Phoenix Suns, Phoenix Open, NASCAR, ASU, U of A, NAU, etc.)
  • Wedding Registry Information
  • Honeymoon Details
  • RSVP Forms
  • Guest Books
  • Music Requests

Copyright 2012, Kim Horn, MBC™

To hire Kim as your wedding planner, call 480.921.7891 or text your name, wedding date, and wedding planner request to 602.418.9089.

Kim M. Horn, MBC™

Master Bridal Consultant | 1 of 61 in the World

Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, Chandler, Phoenix and Destination Weddings

Publisher | Pres. | ArizonaBridalSource.com

AZ State Coordinator Assoc. of Bridal Consultants May 2003 – May 2012

2010 Annual Conference Chair (worked with David Tutera) – Assoc. of Bridal Consultants

O 480.921.7891

C 602.418.9089

F 480.829.6292

E info@ArizonaBridalSource.com

ArizonaBridalSource.com

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TheWrightHouse.com - Wedding Ceremony & Wedding Reception Site in Phoenix, Arizona

TheWrightHouse.com - Wedding Reception Site in Phoenix, Arizona

Normally you will spend more money on your wedding reception food and beverage than on any other part of your wedding. Book your site as far in advance as possible. Your final decision on your site selection depends on your wedding style and number of guests. You may want an outdoor garden wedding, mountain views, cascading waterfalls, or a glass enclosed site with breathtaking sunset photo opportunities.

Call the site and check availability for your date, time of day, and expected number of guests. Traditionally Saturday evenings are popular, so you will pay a premium price based on inventory available. Normally a Saturday evening garden wedding in March will be more expensive than a Sunday afternoon wedding in August in Arizona. You may find more availability if you are flexible and are willing to change your wedding to a Saturday morning, Friday evening, Sunday evening, or during the week. Ask to see if you will receive a discount or have less of a minimum guarantee on revenue if you book an “off peak” month, day or time.

Understand what is included in your reception package. If you don’t understand something, ask questions to get clarification.  Get the price per person or the minimum revenue they are requiring in order for you to book their site. If you have the option of bringing in your own caterer and bartending service, make sure the services you hire are licensed and insured. Find out what the rental fee is for the room and if it is based on the amount of guests. If your guest count increases, this may be a financial consequence to you for additional tables, chairs, etc.  If you have handicapped guests, find out if your location has handicap access.

For menu and service options find out if the caterer has a set menu, or if it may be modified. Get a written cost breakdown and what is included per person based on your budget, the type of service, and the formality of your reception (i.e., valet parking, passed hors d’oeuvres, plated dinner, stations, buffet, open bar, champagne toast, wine pass with dinner, coffee service, wedding cake, tables, chairs, chair covers, linens, crystal, china, flatware, dance floor, heaters, umbrellas for shade, and tents for inclement weather). Will you have a guaranteed price if you book your reception and give a deposit? If the pricing will not be guaranteed, ask for a ceiling on anticipated menu increases, and get everything in writing. What is the tax and gratuity percentage? Gratuity is frequently taxed, which increases your budget. When is your guest count due to the caterer? What is the overage percentage the chef will prepare? What will the pricing be for kids, vegetarians, kosher, gluten free, and vendor meals? If you have leftover food, find out if you may take nonperishable food with you. You may want to check options for delivering perishable food to a nearby homeless shelter. How many hours do you have the site? When may your vendors come in to setup?  Will there be overtime charges if you go beyond the allotted time? What are the cancellation, refund, and change of date policies? Find out when the deposits are due and when the final balance is due. Once you narrow down your options, arrange a taste test with the caterer to taste the menu. Sometimes taste tests are free, other times there is a charge. Ask your caterer for options and flexibility.  Site personnel change frequently, so make sure you get all quotes and contracts in writing, as well as any extras you have negotiated.

Copyright 2012, Kim Horn, MBC™

To hire Kim as your wedding planner, call 480.921.7891 or text your name, wedding date, and wedding planner request to 602.418.9089.

Kim M. Horn, MBC™

Master Bridal Consultant | 1 of 61 in the World

Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, Chandler, Phoenix and Destination Weddings

Publisher | Pres. | ArizonaBridalSource.com

AZ State Coordinator Assoc. of Bridal Consultants May 2003 – May 2012

2010 Annual Conference Chair (worked with David Tutera) – Assoc. of Bridal Consultants

O 480.921.7891

C 602.418.9089

F 480.829.6292

E info@ArizonaBridalSource.com

ArizonaBridalSource.com

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December 30, 2011

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Organize your guest list (if you haven’t already) all in one place.  Make an alphabetized guest list which includes your guests’ full names with their complete addresses.  Depending on which program you use, would highly recommend separating each field (so you may sort as the need arises) by:

  • assign a “special” number to each guest as a “couple”* (see #1 below for details on why you will thank me a billion times for this tip)
  • first name
  • last name (easy to make an alphabetical list by last name of each guest) and title (if any)
  • address
  • city
  • state/country
  • zip/postal code
  • phone number (in case they don’t RSVP and you need to call them)
  • # RSVPed for reception
  • # RSVPed for brunch (the day after your wedding)
    dietary restrictions (if any, especially if you are having a choice of beef, fish, vegetarian, etc.)
  • table number (if you are having assigned seating at your reception)
  • thank-you sent
  • make brief notes of relationships (“Andrew’s mom’s best friend,” “Elena’s fiancé”) NOTE:  as you assemble your list these details will be helpful when you greet guests, arrange table seating, and when you write your thank-you notes.
Birchcraft.com
Birchcraft.com

Read through these tips to make it easier for you:

1).  Make an assembly line so you do each step one by one (one task at a time will make sure you don’t forget to do it for one invitation)!

2).   To keep your sanity once you receive your RSVPs, use your “special” assigned number to each guest on the back of their RSVP card.  Many of your guests will forget to write or fill in their name on their RSVP card when they see the M________________.  When this happens, you receive their RSVP with the number attending, yet you do NOT know who they are!  Easily solve this by being proactive and printing the guest’s “special” number lightly in pencil or an invisible ink pen on the back of your RSVP card.  If your guest forgets to write their name on the line, you will know who is responding.

3).  Consider hiring a calligrapher, or ask your wedding planner for a recommendation of someone who has nice hand writing to address your invitations.   Depending on your envelopes, they may fit into your printer if you are a DIY, check one before continuing this so you don’t damage multiple envelopes.

4).  Do not abbreviate streets, cities, or states.

5).  Write the guests’ full names on the outer envelope (without abbreviations).  Traditionally invitations are inserted into two envelopes, an inner envelope and an outer envelope.  The outer envelope is the one that is addressed and stamped, while the inner envelope has only the names of the people the invitation is addressed to.  For example a married couple’s inner envelope is addressed to “Mr. and Mrs.  Anderson” with neither first names nor address.   You may want to write the names of intimate relatives and lifelong friends in informal terms such as “Uncle Tom and Aunt Sadie”. 

6).  Avoid writing “and guest” or “and family” so everyone invited feels the invitation is especially for him or her.

7).  Before mailing, take an assembled invitation (don’t forget all of your enclosures such as  your maps, RSVP cards, etc.) to your local post office to have them measure and weigh your assembled invitation and confirm you have the correct postage on your invitations.  (The last thing you need is to have your invitations  returned for improper postage or even worse having them delivered to your guests with “postage due”).

8).  In addition to your invitation you may have other enclosures  such as response cards, maps, and tissues.  Make sure everything is assembled one by one so you don’t omit an important item from your invitation mailing.

9).  Stuffing the envelopes:

  • When 2 envelopes are used (inner and outer envelope) put all the enclosures in the inner envelope facing the back.
  • The inner envelope is placed unsealed in the outer envelope with the flap away from the person.
  • When there are insertions, they are placed in front of the invitation, so they face the flap (and the person inserting them).
  • In the case of a folded invitation, insertions are placed in the same direction but within the fold.

10).  Mail invitations eight weeks before the wedding (especially if you are inviting many out-of-town guests). 

11).  Make sure your return address appears on the invitation on the upper left-hand corner, or on the envelope’s flap.  This lets your guests know where to send replies and gifts to in case your return address does not appear on the invitation.

12).  Expect that not everyone will attend.  25 percent of those you invite will not be able to attend.   You will receive your “yes” RSVPs before the “can’t make it”.  

13).  A and B list etiquette.  If you have a “wish” list or “B” list, try to mail all your invitations on the same day regardless of their “list” category.  Remember your “B” list may know some of your “A” list, and vice versa.  You don’t want to hurt the feelings of others by thinking they are not invited to your wedding.

Copyright 2012, Kim Horn, MBC™

To hire Kim as your wedding planner, call 480.921.7891 or text your name, wedding date, and wedding planner request to 602.418.9089.

Kim M. Horn, MBC™

Master Bridal Consultant | 1 of 59 in the World

Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, Chandler, Phoenix and Destination Weddings

Publisher | Pres. | ArizonaBridalSource.com

AZ State Coordinator | Assoc. of Bridal Consultants May 2003 – May 2012

ABC 2010 Conference Chair worked with David Tutera

O 480.921.7891

C 602.418.9089

F 480.829.6292

E info@ArizonaBridalSource.com

ArizonaBridalSource.com

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December 29, 2011

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ArizonaBridalShow.com

ArizonaBridalShow.com

Arizona Bridal Show – Save the Date – Sunday, June 9, 2013 at Phoenix Convention Center in the SOUTH building from 9am – 3pm.  Tickets are $12 at the door.  ArizonaBridalShow.com for tickets online.

Bridal shows are a great planning tool when you are a busy bride, groom, or parent planning an upcoming wedding.  In one day and in one place you are able to talk directly with many different exhibitors, see/hear/taste/smell/touch samples of their work, and get an idea of costs involved in hiring their products and services.  Many bridal show exhibitors have show “discounts” or “specials” available for a limited time.

Bridal shows may be overwhelming, crowded, and confusing.  Would highly recommend you spend time planning ahead to get the most out of your bridal show experience.

After being a wedding planner for 25 years (probably older than you, right), these wedding planning tips are priceless to make your “Bridal Show Experience” the most productive!

1).  Visit the bridal show web site for discount coupons on admission.

2).  Mark your calendar with the day(s), start time, end time, and the location with the address and parking details.

3).  Come early, since the you will get more accomplished.

4).  Attend the fashion show, and check the start time.

5).  Bring the people involved in making major decisions for your wedding.

6).  Bring your phone and take photos and video to capture what you like.

7).  Bring address labels or an address stamp with your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, and wedding date to register for prizes.  This will save you time and prevent writer’s cramp.  Remember to register at locations you are interested in, otherwise your in box and mail box will be overflowing!

8).  Bring a large bag (or bag with wheels) so you may comfortably carry all of the hand-outs and samples you receive from the exhibitors.

9).  Wear comfortable shoes since you will be walking and standing on your feet for hours.

10).  Bring your calendar so you may book appointments.

11).  Bring cash and your check book to take advantage of show discounts on site.

12).  Bring your color swatches if you still need a designer, florist, and bakery.

13).  Make a list of priorities of products and services you need the most.

14).  Some vendors may be able to book 1 or 2 weddings a day which will make them book more quickly.  Photographers, DJs, wedding planners, florists, and videographers may be examples of this vendor type.  Other vendors may be able to book multiple weddings on the same day.  Keep this in mind when organizing your priorities.

15).  Stay until the end of the show, you may be able to have props which are leftover from the exhibitors.

Copyright 2013, Kim Horn, MBC™

To hire Kim as your wedding planner, call 480.921.7891 or text your name, wedding date, and wedding planner request to 602.418.9089.

Kim M. Horn, MBC™

Master Bridal Consultant | 1 of 61 in the World

Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, Chandler, Phoenix and Destination Weddings

Publisher | Pres. | ArizonaBridalSource.com

AZ State Coordinator | Assoc. of Bridal Consultants May 2003 – May 2012

ABC 2010 Conference Chair worked with David Tutera

O 480.921.7891

C 602.418.9089

F 480.829.6292

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September 9, 2011

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Sylvia Weinstock is an incredible cake designer.  The pastry chef you select to design your wedding cake is crucial to the final appearance and taste of your cake.  Arrange a tasting with your pastry chef.  Each bakery has their own “signature recipe”  for flavors, fillings, and icing.  Find out if your cake will be made from scratch or if it will be frozen at any time.  Find out if your bakery will deliver and setup your cake, including your cake topper.  For your initial cake consultation, take photos to share with your pastry chef so they see your vision of your cake style, shape, and color preference.  Make sure you get a color swatch to take with you for your pastry chef to keep in your cake file.  Your only limitation is your imagination.  Use a design from the bodice of your wedding gown, a monogram from your invitation, or another detail which may be enhanced to create a design thread for your wedding theme.  You may want to have different flavors and fillings on different layers so your family and friends get a variety.

Buttercream – icing made of butter, sugar and eggs, and may be used as a filling, or to create details and flowers which are edible.  

Fondant – icing which coats the entire cake and makes a seamless canvas for decorating.  You either love it, or could live without it – taste it.  You will love the look, and many brides prefer the taste to get the versatility in their design.

Whipped Cream – heavy whipping cream and sugar, the same whip cream you know and love. 

Royal Icing – icing which is strictly for decorating complex patterns and details.  Used for a lot of ornate cookies – the hard icing you see on top.

Copyright 2011, Kim Horn, Master Bridal Consultant

To you have your own personal wedding planner, contact:

Kim M. Horn, MBC

Master Bridal Consultant | 1 of 59 in the World

Publisher | Pres. | ArizonaBridalSource.com

Sponsor ArizonaBridalShow.com

AZ State Coordinator | Assoc. of Bridal Consultants

ABC 2010 Conference Chair

O 480.921.7891

C 602.418.9089

F 480.829.6292

E info@ArizonaBridalSource.com

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Kim Kardashian’s Wedding Ring. 

Expenses for your wedding add up quickly. Meet early to discuss and determine realistic budgets and who will be responsible for which expenses so there are no misunderstandings or hard feelings later. The following list indicates the traditional division of expenses. Normally the bride’s family pays for the largest share of the expenses. With the average age of couples getting married on the rise, financial responsibility has shifted from the parents to the couple themselves. The bride’s parents should have the opportunity to graciously decline offers of financial help. The question of who pays for what normally comes down to who is most willing and able to pay. When you are planning your budget, remember to be courteous, realistic, and communicate with everyone involved.

BRIDE
Wedding ring for the groom.
Wedding gift for the groom.
Gifts for the bridal attendants.
Personal stationery.
Accommodations for her out-of-town attendants (optional).
Attendants’ dresses (optional).

BRIDE’S FAMILY
Engagement party (optional).
Bridal consultant.
Cost of ceremony (location, musicians, rentals, flowers, and decorations).
Entire cost of reception (food, beverage, gratuities, wedding cake, rental fee, rental items, decorations, music, and flowers).
Wedding gift for the couple.
Bride’s wedding attire and accessories.
Bridesmaids’ bouquets.
Flower girl bouquet or basket.
Wedding invitations, save the date cards, announcements, enclosures, and mailing costs.
Wedding programs.
Transportation for the bridal party to the ceremony and the reception site.
Engagement, wedding, and reception photographs.
Bridesmaids’ luncheon.
Gratuities for those directing traffic, valet parking, and checking coats.
Personal wedding attire.
Rehearsal dinner (optional).

GROOM
Engagement and wedding rings for the bride.
Wedding gift for the bride.
Marriage license.
Gifts for the best man and groomsmen.
Groom’s wedding attire.
Bride’s bouquet and going-away corsage.
Mothers’ and grandmothers’ corsages.
Boutonnieres for all men in the wedding party.
Accommodations for his out-of-town attendants (optional).
Groomsmen wedding attire (optional).
Attendants’ gloves, ties, ascots, and vests (optional).
Fee for the ceremony officiant.
Honeymoon.
Bachelor dinner (optional).

GROOM’S FAMILY
Personal wedding attire.
Travel and hotel expenses they incur.
Wedding gift for couple.
Bachelor’s dinner (optional).
Rehearsal dinner.

GUESTS
Traveling expenses.
Wedding gift for the couple.

WEDDING PARTY ATTENDANTS
Wedding attire for themselves.
Any traveling expenses.
Wedding gift for the couple.
Showers given by maid of honor or bridesmaids.
Bachelor party given by best man or groomsmen.

BRIDE AND GROOM
Gifts of appreciation for parents or others who helped with the wedding.
Expenses of items desired which have exceeded the original budget.

Copyright 2011, Kim Horn, MBC.

To you have Kim Horn be your wedding planner, contact:

Kim M. Horn, MBC
Master Bridal Consultant | 1 of 59 in the World
Publisher | Pres. | ArizonaBridalSource.com
Sponsor ArizonaBridalShow.com
AZ State Coordinator | Assoc. of Bridal Consultants
ABC 2010 Conference Chair

O 480.921.7891
C 602.418.9089
F 480.829.6292
E info@ArizonaBridalSource.com
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July 1, 2011

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Happy 4th of July!

Hope your 4th of July is a BLAST!

Are you getting married on the 4th of July, or a holiday weekend?  Know in AZ it will be HOT, so drink plenty of water, have umbrellas/parasols/individual fans for each guest if they will be outside for any part of your wedding.  Holidays may lead to overbooked flights, crowded airports, and delayed luggage.  Have your wedding party and family plan ahead when booking their flights, and don’t take the last flight of the day, since if there are cancellations earlier that day, their flight may be delayed, and they may miss the wedding! 

Be thankful we live in America, land of opportunity!

God bless the USA!

Whatever you do today, with your family and friends celebrate YOU and everything you are!

FUN 4th of July Facts:
– Many of us cookout to celebrate the 4th of July!
– Favorite traditional foods are ribs, hamburgers, hot dogs, salads, potato salad, chips and watermelon.
– There’s a 1-in- 6 chance the beef on your grill came from Texas, the leader in production of cattle and calves.
– The chicken on your grill probably came from Georgia, Arkansas, Alabama, North Carolina, or Mississippi.
– The lettuce in your salad or on your hamburger was probably grown in California, which accounts for 3/4 of the USA lettuce production.
– Fresh tomatoes in your salad most likely came from Florida or California, which, combined, produced more than 2/3 of the US tomatoes.
– The ketchup on your hamburger or hot dog probably came from California, which accounted for 95% of the processed tomato production last year.
– The potato salad or potato chips or fries are probably from Idaho or Washington, which produces about 1/2 of the nation’s spuds.
– Favorite dessert on the 4th is watermelon. Arizona, California, Florida, Texas, Indiana, and Georgia combined to produce about 80% of watermelons last year.
Source: Chiff.com

Kim M. Horn, MBC

Master Bridal Consultant | 1 of 59 in the World

Publisher | Pres. | ArizonaBridalSource.com

Sponsor ArizonaBridalShow.com

AZ State Coordinator | Assoc. of Bridal Consultants

ABC 2010 Conference Chair

O 480.921.7891

C 602.418.9089

F 480.829.6292

E info@ArizonaBridalSource.com

ArizonaBridalSource.com

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